The Most Important Feature Of Digital Photography Over Film

Please keep in mind this is my opinion and not a fact.  But, in my opinion the most important feature of digital photography over film is immediacy.  You can see what you have taken right now.  This means you can see the live view, take the picture, and see the results on the back of the camera right away.  The key importance of this is to see if you got the shot you want.  If yes, you are done.  If no, you take another one.

For this shot I watched live view on the DSLR and then could see the picture right away and know I had what I wanted.
For this shot I watched live view on the DSLR and then could see the picture right away and know I had what I wanted.

To get this with a film camera you would take shots bracketing the exposure and hope what you wanted came out when the film was developed.

Victorian building in Port Townsend WA.
Victorian building in Port Townsend WA.

On the other hand this is an easy shot with any camera.  I took this with a cell phone 10 mega pixel camera.  Any film camera including a disposable one would give you a more detailed image.  You could crop the heck out of it and see every detail in the Victorian woodwork.

The other important aspect of immediacy is sharing.  The way most pictures are viewed today is through social media like Facebook, Twitter, texting, emailing, and so on.  With digital pictures you can do this immediately.  Film at best takes a day.  And if you are traveling like we are now, I have seen none of the film pictures I have taken so far and we are five weeks into a 9 week trip.

So I am back to what I said in my first post on this blog about photography.  Both digital and film still have a place if you want the best results.  There is a reason nearly all feature films are shot with film.  The results are what the director and the audience want.  But if you are not a very skilled person, using digital cameras are very useful in tough to shoot lighting and where you want the results now.

 

 

Private RV Parks Are More For The 55+ Crowd

This summer we have been spending much of our time in public RV parks.  The is a switch from our usual trips which generally include more privately owned parks.  For the 55+ crowd who motorhome you will find more people of that description in private parks as compared to publicly owned parks.

Beach Near State Park In Oregon
Beach Near State Park In Oregon

We stayed for a week near an awesome beach next to the cute town of Manzanita.  This is a huge campground.  Out of maybe 250-300 sites that were 95+% full the whole time were were there I did not see one other motorhome of 38’+.  We were the only one.  Even though this park has lots of spaces capable of fitting bigger rigs.

We enjoyed our stay here and will go back, but for those RV campers over 55 looking for other RVers of similar age and some commonality, this is not the best place for you.  The average camper here was either in a tent or had a small towable.  Most of the motorhomes were in the range of 25-30′.  The average age was more like 30-35 for the adults.  And there were lots and lots of kids.  No sewers in the hookups either.

I like walking around the RV park with my dog and striking up conversations with people.  In my opinion this is easier to do with people of a somewhat similar age to you.

 

How Do You Archive & Organize Digital Pictures

When all I used was film I ended up with either negatives & prints or slides.  I made photo print albums and put the slides on Kodak Carousels.  The negatives I put in folders chronologically.  I started buying digital cameras in the late 1990’s and this required a new system to back up-archive and organize.  To complicate matters methods of storing keep changing frequently.

The Beach In Manzanita Oregon
The Beach In Manzanita Oregon
  • Digital pictures can be backed up either locally on some sort of storage medium like your computer, a back up disk, or a thumb drive.  Or you can put them in the cloud on line.  I would suggest using both.
  • If you are a casual picture taker and do not care much about keeping high quality files with lots of pixels you can use Facebook, Google+, Flickr, or any similar site.  The problem is that most of these will reduce the quality of your files when you store them or download them.  Plus no matter how fast your web connection is a local disk is faster.
  • If you care about keeping the file quality as high as possible it is best to keep a local copy on a mass storage device like a back up drive.  You can use thumb drives, but if you use large files like RAW data, disk drives are much less expensive.  I would suggest strongly using some type of photo software and then sticking with it.  I have used free Picasa for my work photos for years and it makes it very easy to find your pictures and if you want sync them with Google+.  For my personal pictures I like a Mac computer and I have iPhoto and Aperture.  I used to use Photoshop a lot and learned many of the complexities of their system.  If you use Windows computers I would suggest some type of Photoshop program.  There is Lightroom and Photoshop Elements.

beach sunset edited

There are all sorts of on line storage options as mentioned previously.  If you want to store full size files, keep them organized, and download them full sized your options are limited.  Dropbox, Onedrive, and a few others can do this, but then you end up with a large amount of storage space used on your local computer when the on line syncs with your local.  Flikr allows you to upload full sized files and gives you a terra byte of storage free.  They also allow you to download your files full size, but only one at a time.  There is a multiple file download app for flikr that I have tried.  It reduces the size of the files.

So what am I doing to archive files and organize them.

  • I still have prints made and put them in photo albums.  This is time consuming, but the books that result are satisfying to hold and look through.  If you want to do this I strongly recommend Kolo books you can get from Amazon or local shops.  The cheap Chinese ones are nowhere near as good.
  • I put my pictures on back up disk drives.  I have the Seagate and Western Digital ones.
  • I also put many of my digital albums on line.  Generally I put smaller file sizes on line for easier handling.  I would not put huge RAW files in the cloud.  Although my film developer sends me my high quality scans through dropbox.  That system works very well.
  • I organize my pictures in albums.  I use both Picasa and iPhoto to do that.  I have found that putting the year before the subject of the album helps you locate things later.
Flower Garden Outside A Store In Eugene OR
Flower Garden Outside A Store In Eugene OR